Banfield, Jillian F.


Publications
20

Asgard archaea modulate potential methanogenesis substrates in wetland soil

Citation
Valentin-Alvarado et al. (2023).
Names
“Atabeyarchaeia”
Abstract
AbstractThe roles of Asgard archaea in eukaryogenesis and marine biogeochemical cycles are well studied, yet their contributions in soil ecosystems are unknown. Of particular interest are Asgard archaeal contributions to methane cycling in wetland soils. To investigate this, we reconstructed two complete genomes for soil-associated Atabeyarchaeia, a new Asgard lineage, and the first complete genome of Freyarchaeia, and defined their metabolismin situ. Metatranscriptomics highlights high expressi

Candidatus Nealsonbacteria” Are Likely Biomass Recycling Ectosymbionts of Methanogenic Archaea in a Stable Benzene-Degrading Enrichment Culture

Citation
Chen et al. (2023). Applied and Environmental Microbiology 89 (5)
Names
“Nealsoniibacteriota”
Abstract
An anaerobic microbial enrichment culture was used to study members of candidate phyla that are difficult to grow in the lab. We were able to visualize tiny “ Candidatus Nealsonbacteria” cells attached to a large Methanothrix cell, revealing a novel episymbiosis.

Candidatus Nealsonbacteria (OD1) in a methanogenic benzene-degrading enrichment culture is likely an ectosymbiotic biomass recycler

Citation
Chen et al. (2022).
Names
“Nealsoniibacteriota”
Abstract
AbstractThe Candidate Phyla Radiation (CPR, or superphylum Patescibacteria) is a very large group of bacteria with few cultivated representatives first discovered by culture-independent metagenomic analyses. Within the CPR, the candidate phylum Parcubacteria (previously OD1) is prevalent in anoxic lake sediments and groundwater. We identified a bacterium belonging to the Parcubacteria in a methanogenic benzene-degrading enrichment culture originally derived from oil-contaminated sediments. Candi

Genome-resolved metagenomics reveals site-specific diversity of episymbiotic CPR bacteria and DPANN archaea in groundwater ecosystems

Citation
He et al. (2021). Nature Microbiology 6 (3)
Names
“Montesoliibacteriota”
Abstract
AbstractCandidate phyla radiation (CPR) bacteria and DPANN archaea are unisolated, small-celled symbionts that are often detected in groundwater. The effects of groundwater geochemistry on the abundance, distribution, taxonomic diversity and host association of CPR bacteria and DPANN archaea has not been studied. Here, we performed genome-resolved metagenomic analysis of one agricultural and seven pristine groundwater microbial communities and recovered 746 CPR and DPANN genomes in total. The pr

Differential depth distribution of microbial function and putative symbionts through sediment-hosted aquifers in the deep terrestrial subsurface

Citation
Probst et al. (2018). Nature Microbiology 3 (3)
Names
“Moissliibacteriota” “Ratteibacteriota” “Saganiibacteriota” “Torokiibacteriota” “Altiarchaeota” “Altiarchaeia” “Altiarchaeales” “Altiarchaeaceae” “Altiarchaeum hamiconexum” “Altiarchaeum”
Abstract
AbstractAn enormous diversity of previously unknown bacteria and archaea has been discovered recently, yet their functional capacities and distributions in the terrestrial subsurface remain uncertain. Here, we continually sampled a CO2-driven geyser (Colorado Plateau, Utah, USA) over its 5-day eruption cycle to test the hypothesis that stratified, sandstone-hosted aquifers sampled over three phases of the eruption cycle have microbial communities that differ both in membership and function. Geno

Complete 4.55-Megabase-Pair Genome of “ Candidatus Fluviicola riflensis,” Curated from Short-Read Metagenomic Sequences

Citation
Banfield et al. (2017). Genome Announcements 5 (47)
Names
Ca. Fluviicola riflensis
Abstract
ABSTRACT We report the 4.55-Mbp genome of “ Candidatus Fluviicola riflensis” ( Bacteroidetes ) that was manually curated to completion from Illumina data. “ Ca . Fluviicola riflensis” is a facultative anaerobe. Its ability to grow over a range of O 2 levels may favor its proliferation in an aquifer adjacent to the Colorado River in the United States.

Genomic resolution of a cold subsurface aquifer community provides metabolic insights for novel microbes adapted to high CO<sub>2</sub> concentrations

Citation
Probst et al. (2017). Environmental Microbiology 19 (2)
Names
“Desantisiibacteriota”
Abstract
SummaryAs in many deep underground environments, the microbial communities in subsurface high‐CO2 ecosystems remain relatively unexplored. Recent investigations based on single‐gene assays revealed a remarkable variety of organisms from little studied phyla in Crystal Geyser (Utah, USA), a site where deeply sourced CO2‐saturated fluids are erupted at the surface. To provide genomic resolution of the metabolisms of these organisms, we used a novel metagenomic approach to recover 227 high‐quality