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Expansion of Armatimonadota through marine sediment sequencing describes two classes with unique ecological roles

Citation
Carlton et al. (2023). ISME Communications 3 (1)
Names
“Hebobacteraceae” “Hebobacterales” “Hebobacteria” “Zipacnadaceae” “Zipacnadales” “Zipacnadia” “Hebobacterum abditum” “Hebobacterum” “Zipacnadum vermilionense” “Zipacnadum”
Abstract
AbstractMarine sediments comprise one of the largest environments on the planet, and their microbial inhabitants are significant players in global carbon and nutrient cycles. Recent studies using metagenomic techniques have shown the complexity of these communities and identified novel microorganisms from the ocean floor. Here, we obtained 77 metagenome-assembled genomes (MAGs) from the bacterial phylum Armatimonadota in the Guaymas Basin, Gulf of California, and the Bohai Sea, China. These MAGs

Differential depth distribution of microbial function and putative symbionts through sediment-hosted aquifers in the deep terrestrial subsurface

Citation
Probst et al. (2018). Nature Microbiology 3 (3)
Names
“Moissliibacteriota” “Ratteibacteriota” “Saganiibacteriota” “Torokiibacteriota” “Altiarchaeota” “Altiarchaeia” “Altiarchaeales” “Altiarchaeaceae” “Altiarchaeum hamiconexum” “Altiarchaeum”
Abstract
AbstractAn enormous diversity of previously unknown bacteria and archaea has been discovered recently, yet their functional capacities and distributions in the terrestrial subsurface remain uncertain. Here, we continually sampled a CO2-driven geyser (Colorado Plateau, Utah, USA) over its 5-day eruption cycle to test the hypothesis that stratified, sandstone-hosted aquifers sampled over three phases of the eruption cycle have microbial communities that differ both in membership and function. Geno

Phylogenomics and ancestral reconstruction of Korarchaeota reveals genomic adaptation to habitat switching

Citation
Tahon et al. (2023).
Names
“Korarchaeum calidifontum” “Caldabyssikora” “Korarchaeum” “Caldabyssikoraceae” “Caldabyssikora taketomiensis” “Caldabyssikora guaymasensis” “Thermotainarokoraceae” “Thermotainarokora guaymasensis” “Thermotainarokora taketomiensis” “Hydrocaminikoraceae”
Abstract
AbstractOur knowledge of archaeal diversity and evolution has expanded rapidly in the past decade. However, hardly any genomes of the phylum Korarchaeota have been obtained due to the difficulty in accessing their natural habitats and – possibly – their limited abundance. As a result, many aspects of Korarchaeota biology, physiology and evolution remain enigmatic. Here, we expand this phylum with five high-quality metagenome-assembled genomes. This improved taxon sampling combined with sophistic

Symbionts of the ciliate Euplotes : diversity, patterns and potential as models for bacteria–eukaryote endosymbioses

Citation
Boscaro et al. (2019). Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences 286 (1907)
Names
“Euplotella” “Fujishimia” “Parafinniella” “Anadelfobacter sociabilis” “Bandiella numerosa” “Euplotella sexta” “Finniella dimorpha” “Fujishimia apicalis” “Parafinniella ignota”
Abstract
Endosymbioses between bacteria and eukaryotes are enormously important in ecology and evolution, and as such are intensely studied. Despite this, the range of investigated hosts is narrow in the context of the whole eukaryotic tree of life: most of the information pertains to animal hosts, while most of the diversity is found in unicellular protists. A prominent case study is the ciliate Euplotes , which has repeatedly taken up the bacterium Polyn

Phenotypic and genomic characterization of Bathyarchaeum tardum gen. nov., sp. nov., a cultivated representative of the archaeal class Bathyarchaeia

Citation
Khomyakova et al. (2023). Frontiers in Microbiology 14
Names
Bathyarchaeum tardum Ts Bathyarchaeum Bathyarchaeia Bathyarchaeales Bathyarchaeaceae Methanocrinis Methanocrinis harundinaceus Ts Methanocrinis alkalitolerans Methanocrinis natronophilus
Abstract
Bathyarchaeia are widespread in various anoxic ecosystems and are considered one of the most abundant microbial groups on the earth. There are only a few reports of laboratory cultivation of Bathyarchaeia, and none of the representatives of this class has been isolated in pure culture. Here, we report a sustainable cultivation of the Bathyarchaeia archaeon (strain M17CTs) enriched from anaerobic sediment of a coastal lake. The cells of strain M17CTs were small non-motile cocci, 0.4–0.7 μm in dia