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Naming the unnamed: over 65,000 Candidatus names for unnamed Archaea and Bacteria in the Genome Taxonomy Database

Citation
Pallen et al. (2022). International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology 72 (9)
Names
“Afabia udivosa” “Afabia” “Afabiaceae” “Afabiales” “Afabiia” “Afabiota” “Paenistieleria bergensis”
Abstract
Thousands of new bacterial and archaeal species and higher-level taxa are discovered each year through the analysis of genomes and metagenomes. The Genome Taxonomy Database (GTDB) provides hierarchical sequence-based descriptions and classifications for new and as-yet-unnamed taxa. However, bacterial nomenclature, as currently configured, cannot keep up with the need for new well-formed names. Instead, microbiologists have been forced to use hard-to-remember alphanumeric placeholder labels. Here

Undinarchaeota illuminate DPANN phylogeny and the impact of gene transfer on archaeal evolution

Citation
Dombrowski et al. (2020). Nature Communications 11 (1)
Names
“Undinarchaeia” “Undinarchaeota” “Naiadarchaeales” “Undinarchaeales” “Naiadarchaeaceae” “Undinarchaeaceae” “Undinarchaeum marinum”
Abstract
AbstractThe recently discovered DPANN archaea are a potentially deep-branching, monophyletic radiation of organisms with small cells and genomes. However, the monophyly and early emergence of the various DPANN clades and their role in life’s evolution are debated. Here, we reconstructed and analysed genomes of an uncharacterized archaeal phylum (CandidatusUndinarchaeota), revealing that its members have small genomes and, while potentially being able to conserve energy through fermentation, like

Phylogeny resolved, metabolism revealed: functional radiation within a widespread and divergent clade of sponge symbionts

Citation
Taylor et al. (2021). The ISME Journal 15 (2)
Names
Perseibacter sydneyensis Ts Perseibacter Perseibacteraceae Tethybacter castelli Ts Tethybacter Tethybacteraceae Tethybacterales
Abstract
Abstract The symbiosis between bacteria and sponges has arguably the longest evolutionary history for any extant metazoan lineage, yet little is known about bacterial evolution or adaptation in this process. An example of often dominant and widespread bacterial symbionts of sponges is a clade of uncultured and uncharacterised Proteobacteria. Here we set out to characterise this group using metagenomics, in-depth phylogenetic analyses, metatranscriptomics, and fluorescence in situ

Diversity of Symbiotic Organs and Bacterial Endosymbionts of Lygaeoid Bugs of the Families Blissidae and Lygaeidae (Hemiptera: Heteroptera: Lygaeoidea)

Citation
Kuechler et al. (2012). Applied and Environmental Microbiology 78 (8)
Names
“Arocatia” Ca. Rohrkolberia cinguli “Ischnodemia” “Arocatia carayonii” “Ischnodemia utriculi” “Typhincola belonochilicola”
Abstract
ABSTRACT Here we present comparative data on the localization and identity of intracellular symbionts among the superfamily Lygaeoidea (Insecta: Hemiptera: Heteroptera: Pentatomomorpha). Five different lygaeoid species from the families Blissidae and Lygaeidae (sensu stricto; including the subfamilies Lygaeinae and Orsillinae) were analyzed. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) revealed that all the bugs studied possess paired bacteriomes that

Metabolic Versatility of the FamilyHalieaceaeRevealed by the Genomics of Novel Cultured Isolates

Citation
Li et al. (2023). Microbiology Spectrum 11 (2)
Names
Litorirhabdus singularis Ts Marimicrobium litorale Litorirhabdus Seongchinamella marina Paraluminiphilus aquimaris Ts Paraluminiphilus
Abstract
Although the familyHalieaceae(OM60/NOR5 clade) is an abundant and cosmopolitan clade widely found in coastal seas and involved in interactions with phytoplankton, a limited number of cultured isolates are available. In this study, we isolated six pure culturedHalieaceaestrains from coastal seawaters and performed a comparative physiological and genomic analysis to give insights into the phylogeny and metabolic potential of this family.